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Safeway Edh Price Gouging Vs Folsom Safeway


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#1 palango

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:21 PM


How is it possible that the very same company charges complete different prices???

1lb Banana @ Folsom safe way = 33 cents and the same at NEW EDH location = 67 cents???

Case of Arrowhead bottle water @ Folsom Safeway = $3.99, but in EDH = $4.50???

Is this legal???

I should call Kurtis to expose the overpriced punks at the EDH safeway.

#2 Chad Vander Veen

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:49 PM

QUOTE(palango @ Feb 13 2007, 01:21 PM) View Post
How is it possible that the very same company charges complete different prices???

1lb Banana @ Folsom safe way = 33 cents and the same at NEW EDH location = 67 cents???

Case of Arrowhead bottle water @ Folsom Safeway = $3.99, but in EDH = $4.50???

Is this legal???

I should call Kurtis to expose the overpriced punks at the EDH safeway.


Why would it be illegal? That "country market" you go to when camping somewhere can charge an arm and leg.

#3 Orangetj

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:53 PM

You're not kidding about the "country market" prices! With regards to the EDH Safeway, I can't see any reason it would be illegal. People in EDH have the choice to go to stores with better prices. For many, I imagine the convenience of the local store outweighs the price difference.

#4 mylo

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 02:01 PM

I'd shop in Folsom if I were you
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#5 ESP Guy

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 02:21 PM

OMG SOME ONE HAS HIGHER PRICES CALL THE COPS
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#6 old soldier

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 03:56 PM

I have two thoughts, the eldorado folks are richer and probably don't mind much. they would pay more to save the gas money from coming down to folsom

also they have the truck the goods a little farther up the hill. safeway charges more than albertsons and lots more than winco (where the smartest folks shop)

#7 palango

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 05:12 PM

i just thought that when you to Starbucks in Folsom, you pay the same for a coffee than the one 5-10 miles from Folsom. I thought Safeway was NOT a governed by franchising rules where differnt stoers charge complete different prices for the same things.

#8 spork

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 05:20 PM

We shop there. It is convenient for us.

#9 Ice

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 05:48 PM

QUOTE(old soldier @ Feb 13 2007, 04:56 PM) View Post
I have two thoughts, the eldorado folks are richer and probably don't mind much. they would pay more to save the gas money from coming down to folsom


Specially driving those hummers all the way from eldorado. What do those things get anyway? 18 gallons a mile?

#10 gorilla

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 07:04 PM

Rich people are suckers, makes them feel better to spend more. They are charged more in EDH so that way they will think they have a better product because they paid more. Therefore the same product purchase in Folsom sucks by comparison to the same product purchased in EDH. Get with the program!

#11 cw68

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 07:06 PM

QUOTE(Ice @ Feb 13 2007, 05:48 PM) View Post
Specially driving those hummers all the way from eldorado. What do those things get anyway? 18 gallons a mile?

An H2 gets 9.6 MPG.

#12 Steve Heard

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE(gorilla @ Feb 13 2007, 07:04 PM) View Post
Rich people are suckers, makes them feel better to spend more.

That is a common misconception, or is it misperception?

Anyway, I've dealt with rich folks for much of my life, and although there are some who toss coin around, most are downright frugal.

I know one who drove his 1980's Honda Civic, the base model he purchased new, until last year when it would no longer pass smog inspection. He had a crack in the windshield for a couple of years, refusing to pay to have it fixed. When home, he uses a space heater to heat the room he's in. He's a doctor, and didn't go to work one day in December because they were having a gift exchange, and everyone was required to buy a gift valued at about $20.

I know another who rents an apartment, even though he's got millions in stock.

One guy had a chain of stores. He wore the same clothes every day, and brown bagged his lunch. He still worked because he didn't want to hire anyone to run the company.

The worst is a lady I know who gave her kids the use of 1 towel a week, 1 paper bag and 1 sandwich bag for the school year, filled the sink with water for washing dishes so as not to use the dishwasher, and took napkins from fast food restaurants to be used as toilet paper. She owns homes in San Francisco, Hawaii and Tahoe. When her kids come to visit her, she gives them hefty bags full of garbage to take away.

When I take loan applications for these folks, I am amazed at how little they spend. Most have a mortgage, but few have car payments, and most pay their credit cards off, or don't use them at all.

On the other hand, I deal with broke folks, too. I had a guy refinance to pay pay off thousands in credit card debt, and then he showed up in a new Mustang Saleen. Another who rents, but owns a big-screen tv, has Direct TV, surround sound, nice furniture, and a nice car. He says he deserves the same stuff the rich folks have.

Here are some tidbits from "The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of American's Wealthy"

These people cannot be millionaires! They don't look like millionaires, they don't dress like millionaires, they don't eat like millionaires, they don't act like millionaires--they don't even have millionaire names. Where are the millionaires who look like millionaires?
The person who said this was a vice president of a trust department. He made these comments following a focus group interview and dinner that we hosted for ten first-generation millionaires. His view of millionaires is shared by most people who are not wealthy. They think millionaires own expensive clothes, watches, and other status artifacts. We have found this is not the case.

PORTRAIT Of A MILLIONAIRE

Who is the prototypical American millionaire? What would he tell you about himself?(*)

* I am a fifty-seven-year-old male, married with three children. About 70 percent of us earn 80 percent or more of our household's income.

* Many of the types of businesses we are in could be classified as dullnormal. We are welding contractors, auctioneers, rice farmers, owners of mobile-home parks, pest controllers, coin and stamp dealers, and paving contractors.

* We have an average household net worth of $3.7 million. Of course, some of our cohorts have accumulated much more. Nearly 6 percent have a net worth of over $10 million. Again, these people skew our average upward. The typical (median, or 50th percentile) millionaire household has a net worth of $1.6 million.

* On average, our total annual realized income is less than 7 percent of our wealth. In other words, we live on less than 7 percent of our wealth.

* Most of us (97 percent) are homeowners. We live in homes currently valued at an average of $320,000. About half of us have occupied the same home for more than twenty years. Thus, we have enjoyed significant increases in the value of our homes.

* We live well below our means. We wear inexpensive suits and drive American-made cars. Only a minority of us drive the current-model-year automobile. Only a minority ever lease our motor vehicles.

* Most of our wives are planners and meticulous budgeters. In fact, only 18 percent of us disagreed with the statement "Charity begins at home." Most of us will tell you that our wives are a lot more conservative with money than we are.

* We have a "go-to-hell fund." In other words, we have accumulated enough wealth to live without working for ten or more years. Thus, those of us with a net worth of $1.6 million could live comfortably for more than twelve years. Actually, we could live longer than that, since we save at least 15 percent of our earned income.

* We have more than six and one-half times the level of wealth of our nonmillionaire neighbors, but, in our neighborhood, these nonmillionaires outnumber us better than three to one. Could it be that they have chosen to trade wealth for acquiring high-status material possessions?

* About two-thirds of us work between forty-five and fifty-five hours per week.

* We are fastidious investors. On average, we invest nearly 20 percent of our household realized income each year. Most of us invest at least 15 percent. Seventy-nine percent of us have at least one account with a brokerage company. But we make our own investment decisions.

* We hold nearly 20 percent of our household's wealth in transaction securities such as publicly traded stocks and mutual funds. But we rarely sell our equity investments. We hold even more in our pension plans.

* I am a tightwad. That's one of the main reasons I completed a long questionnaire for a crispy $1 bill. Why else would I spend two or three hours being personally interviewed by these authors? They paid me $100, $200, or $250. Oh, they made me another offer--to donate in my name the money I earned for my interview to my favorite charity. But I told them, "I am my favorite charity."















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#13 sat

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:10 PM

Getting back to the topic of some prices being different in two Safeways...I worked in the grocery business for many years, and if a price is advertised in the ad, of course, all stores would charge the same price. However, one store might be overstocked on a particular item and will reduce the price to get rid of it. In your example, Folsom Safeway might be sitting on a couple of pallets of bananas, and rather than lose half of them due to rotting, they reduce the price to clear them out. As for the water, even though it has a long shelf life, it does take up room in the backroom, where space is limited. Perhaps an employee was a little overzealous in his ordering of the water, and in order to free up space, like the bananas, it is marked down to clear out.

#14 realtor

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Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:22 PM

I used to work for Safeway in the bay area BC (before children) and we always seemed to have different specials running depending on how fast the product was moving. It's the old supply/demand thing. I've seen differences here at Raleys too...the newer one is way overpriced compared to the one on Bidwell. The rents in these new places are over the top and the older stores have an established sales pattern so can afford to cut their prices to move product. I agree the newer stores offer more to choose from but I still go to the older stores to stock up...especially with two teenagers and friends here!

#15 jafount

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:55 PM

I'm a hard working single full-time father of three who is so damn far from being rich, it's not even funny. Why, because I choose to live in EDH closer to my place of employment, am I classified as "rich"? I have to ask, are there Folsomites with an inferiority complex, or is it just bad jokes?
We all dream of a world of sunshine and rainbows and peace. The problem is some people think this would be a great place to live, while others think it would be a great place to pillage.





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