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Explosion In Arc South?


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#1 The Average Joe

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 11:39 PM

On Tuesday Feb 9th, around midnight, there was a huge boom that was much louder than a gunshot. I called it in to 911, and not only was I connected immediately, but thy already had an officer in the area ( I called about 15 seconds after the sound). The officer came by, and said he thought it might have been a tansformer blowing up, but power was still on everywhere I could see.
Anyone hear anything about what it was?

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#2 aztransplant

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 08:12 AM

QUOTE (JBailey @ Feb 10 2010, 11:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
On Tuesday Feb 9th, around midnight, there was a huge boom that was much louder than a gunshot. I called it in to 911, and not only was I connected immediately, but thy already had an officer in the area ( I called about 15 seconds after the sound). The officer came by, and said he thought it might have been a tansformer blowing up, but power was still on everywhere I could see.
Anyone hear anything about what it was?


Strange. DH and I, as well as our two dogs must have slept right through it. I say strange, because our dogs will jump up out of a deep sleep and out the dog door if they so much as hear a squirrel outside.

Keep us posted if you find out what it was. Thanks.

#3 Inwit

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 10:45 AM

QUOTE (JBailey @ Feb 10 2010, 11:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
On Tuesday Feb 9th, around midnight, there was a huge boom that was much louder than a gunshot. I called it in to 911, and not only was I connected immediately, but thy already had an officer in the area ( I called about 15 seconds after the sound). The officer came by, and said he thought it might have been a tansformer blowing up, but power was still on everywhere I could see.
Anyone hear anything about what it was?

Did it sound like a sonic boom?
n. 1. Inward sense; mind; understanding; conscience.

#4 The Average Joe

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 12:42 PM

No, a sonic boom is a louder-more distant kind of sound...this was a fairly close (I'd say within a block) sharp boom. Much louder than a large caliber gun. Because the house across the street has had work being done on it, my first thought was a small propane tank blowing up, or something of that nature.

Now that I think about it, only a few of the many dogs around were barking...strange.

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive." -- C.S. Lewis

 

If the only way to combat "global warming" was to lower taxes, we would never hear of the issue again. - Anonymous

 

                                                                  It is Natural when Intelligence sees Stupid, it rejects Stupid, and Opts for Truth..... Stupid then labels Truth as Hate.-  Anonymous

 


 


#5 curiousity

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 12:51 PM

No, a sonic boom is a louder-more distant kind of sound...

I guess you've never had an F-4 flyover ya 200 feet or so off the deck while super-sonic?

Louder, most definitely, more distant, not hardly.

#6 AMETHYST PRODUCTIVITY

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 02:29 PM

We used to live in LA, right in the flight path when the space shuttles came in to land at Edwards. First time it happened, I thought our house had exploded. It is incredibly loud.

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#7 The Average Joe

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 04:42 PM

QUOTE (curiousity @ Feb 11 2010, 12:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
No, a sonic boom is a louder-more distant kind of sound...

I guess you've never had an F-4 flyover ya 200 feet or so off the deck while super-sonic?

Louder, most definitely, more distant, not hardly.


Hehe, doubt there were any Phantoms going supersonic at treetop over my house last night...but that would have been cool!

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive." -- C.S. Lewis

 

If the only way to combat "global warming" was to lower taxes, we would never hear of the issue again. - Anonymous

 

                                                                  It is Natural when Intelligence sees Stupid, it rejects Stupid, and Opts for Truth..... Stupid then labels Truth as Hate.-  Anonymous

 


 


#8 mikat

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 05:13 PM

I heard that explosion sound too. I expected to hear sirens afterwards but never did.
I couldn't tell in what direction the sound came from so I didn't call it in. It wasn't super close. I figured people who were closer to it than me and would have better information would call it in. We live across Folsom-Auburn, on the recreation (not "bike" ;-) ) trail, so if it was in ARC and I heard it, it must have been pretty loud.

#9 aztransplant

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 01:13 PM

Checked the City of Folsom website February 9 police log and this does not show up . . . so, checked the February 10 log, in case it might show up there if it happened after midnight . . . no dice. The February "10" log, is a duplicate of the February 9 log. Sigh . . .

#10 FolsomBarb

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:35 AM

Perhaps this would be the explanation? (oddly enough, I think I have experienced this at least once...)

http://bodyodd.msnbc...17/2204845.aspx

Loud crash at 3 a.m.? It may be your exploding head
Posted on Wednesday, February 17, 2010 3:24 PM PT
By Diane Mapes, contributor

Marie Raymond sometimes wakes up in the middle of the night, heart pounding, freaked out by the sound of her name being shouted loud and clear. Other times she’ll be awakened by the sound of a huge crash, as if someone has broken a window or knocked over a set of dishes.

“The sound is terrifying — super loud, like someone has broken in,” says Raymond, a 38-year-old arts administrator from Seattle. “But when I get up to look around, nothing’s amiss and everything’s quiet.” After dealing with it off and on for the last several months, Raymond believes she may have exploding head syndrome. She hasn’t seen a doctor about it, but has done some research online.




As strange as the name sounds, exploding head syndrome is actually a rare and relatively undocumented sleep phenomenon. While sleeping or dozing, a person with the condition hears a terrifically loud sound in their head, such as a bomb exploding, a clash of cymbals or a gun going off.

“It’s usually described as a loud bang or pop that occurs in the first third of the night,” says Dr. Neil Kline, sleep physician and representative of the American Sleep Association in Wilmington, Del. “It’s a sensory phenomenon. The individual senses that some type of explosion has occurred nearby, but ultimately realizes it’s in their head. It’s not associated with pain or with any disorder that we know of and there are no physiological medical consequences that are associated with it.”

Thought to be brought on by anxiety or extreme fatigue and occurring in clusters during stressful periods, exploding head syndrome is not dangerous, according to the American Sleep Association Web site.

It can be disconcerting, though, stirring up images of a David Cronenberg movie. “Individuals can develop an aversion to falling asleep,” says Kline. “They’ll develop insomnia because they’re concerned by these occurrences. But they’re usually rare. I’ve never heard of it occurring regularly.”

First described in 1920 as a “snapping of the brain,” there is little to be found on the phenomenon in medical literature. Some patients experience a bright flash of light along with the loud explosion or crash, according to a 1989 study in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry that looked at 50 patients suffering from the syndrome. In almost every case there are physical aftereffects, such as “a sense of alarm, together with a cold sweat, labored breathing and tachycardia” (a rapid heart rate).

Or as Raymond puts it, you suddenly wake up “feeling like a character out of Poe.”

As for the explosions themselves, patients have described them as a shotgun blast, a thunderclap, a loud metallic noise, the clash of cymbals, a lightning strike or the sound of every door in the house slamming. Luckily, the crash, bang, or boom lasts only a few seconds and disappears as soon as the person awakens. Episodes, which are usually clustered over the course of a few days, will then disappear for months — or years — on end.

It’s unclear why stress would bring on a crashing sound in your heard, although some have speculated that it may be the result of a movement of the middle ear component or of the eustachian tube.

J.M.S. Pearce, the British neurologist who coined the term, calls it a “mystery” requiring further study. He also felt the phenomenon was not as rare as some believe, perhaps due to people’s hesitancy to discuss it. “Many [patients] said they had been ashamed to mention it to their doctors or that their complaint had been greeted with incredulity if not frank disbelief,” he wrote in his 1989 study “Clinical features of the exploding head syndrome.” “It is entirely benign, and I suspect quite common, but underreported.”

Exploding head syndrome is said to happen more often after the age of 50 (although there have been reports of it happening in children) and believed to be more common among women. Due to the rarity of the syndrome, though, it’s hard to establish any kind of parameters, says Kline.

“I’m not convinced there’s good data that describes the demographic of this phenomenon,” he says. “I’ve only had a few patients during my career who have described it and no one has ever asked to be treated for it.”

Since the phenomenon is often linked to stress, sleep experts suggest relaxation techniques like exercise, reading before bedtime or yoga to help alleviate the episodes. According to studies, a few patients have also found relief by taking certain types of antidepressants. A 2001 study in the journal Current Pain and Headache Reports found “most sufferers require only reassurance that the spells are benign in nature.”

But hearing a sudden loud banging in the middle of the night can be very frightening. “So if an individual is experiencing this and it’s disrupting their sleep or causing them anxiety, they should talk to their doctor about it,” Kline advises.

Despite the sensational name, there’s no danger that your head will actually blow apart.
“When most people hear of it, they visualize an individual’s head exploding,” says Kline That’s not what happens.”

I assume full responsibility for my actions, except the ones that are someone else's fault.

#11 The Average Joe

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 08:27 PM

Hehe, while many would argue that I frequently experience a 'snapping of the brain," I was wide awake at the time, and so was the officer I spoke with. Interesting find though...

"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive." -- C.S. Lewis

 

If the only way to combat "global warming" was to lower taxes, we would never hear of the issue again. - Anonymous

 

                                                                  It is Natural when Intelligence sees Stupid, it rejects Stupid, and Opts for Truth..... Stupid then labels Truth as Hate.-  Anonymous

 


 





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