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Rsvp Or To Not Rsvp


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#1 ceeanada

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 10:47 PM

It is necessary to RSVP for a kids birthday party anymore?

 

I have been to and planned birthday parties when kids just show up and usually the more the merrier.

 

But what about if a birthday party happens and nobody RSVPs and you don't have good (reliable) contact information to cancel...

 

What should you do?

 

Well this happened to my son and we made a gametime decision to re-schedule the party and I would just take him and his best friend to sunsplash for the day. (Best arcade in area)

 

We did wait for about 20 mins at the original party location and time, and if anyone did show up we would invite anyone else along to Sunsplash. Nobody showed up so we sped up to Roseville.

 

Lo and behold someone arrived later at the party location, had my contact details, but I was already up in Roseville. It was an awkward conversation because I didn't want to make the parent feel bad for not RSVPing.

 

My son did have a super day at Sunsplash with his friend, which was better than 2 kids sitting around a huge table singing happy birthday. But I wonder if I should of done something different?!?



#2 Deb aka Resume Lady

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 11:14 PM

Good question. Some people think they should call only if they can attend. Other people think they should call only if they can't attend. Both groups are wrong.

 

RSVP means "please respond."

 

I don't use "RSVP" any more because so many people do not understand what it means and don't practice good etiquette. Instead, I use: "Please call by DATE to let me know whether or not you can attend." Folks I don't hear from get a call. I need to know how many people to plan for.

 

Those folks who didn't respond and arrived late for your party have no one to blame but themselves.


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#3 cw68

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 11:25 PM

Yes, you absolutely RSVP. Manners, people.

 

Like Deb above, giving a date before which one should RSVP is helpful (which reminds me, I have one due by the 19th).

 

IMHO, you should not have worried about making anyone feel badly for not RSVPing, they should feel bad instead.



#4 giacomo

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 07:13 AM

It's simple common courtesy. It might be 2014 and the age of E-vites and facebook/twitter, but manners should never go out the window.  The host took time to invite you, so you should take time to rsvp, plus it helps them knowing ahead of time how many are coming to the event  to prep for the party.   



#5 SacKen

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 06:05 PM

... It was an awkward conversation because I didn't want to make the parent feel bad for not RSVPing. ...

 

Go ahead and make them feel bad.  People that consistently don't RSVP need to be shamed.  Sometimes people forget because they are waiting to know for sure, so it is a good idea to prod them when your need-to-know date is approaching. But even when we get responses after asking again, the lack of initial response wasn't for any reason other than they are freakin' rude and just didn't RSVP.

 

We should start a national movement to start denying the non-responders entry to the event and maybe their behavior will change. :WEDGIE:


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#6 folsom44

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 07:03 PM

A parent that doesn't rsvp to a kids party should be ashamed of themselves. Of course the birthday boy or girl wants to know who of their friends is coming! Incredibly RUDE. Sorry this happened to you. How old was he turning?

#7 Steve Heard

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 07:25 PM

A couple of recent experiences:

  • Someone I know told me that when a guest arrived at her party, she said, "Since you didn't RSVP, I thought you weren't coming." The guest replied, "RSVP is only required if you are NOT going to attend."
  • Another person didn't RSVP, and the hostess called a couple of days in advance to check with him. He made an excuse for not being able to make it, but later let it be known that the real reason was because she had called. He said, "I can't stand it when people pressure you by calling to see if you're coming." Trying to get a head-count is now considered pressure?

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#8 Chad Vander Veen

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:25 PM

 

A couple of recent experiences:

  • Someone I know told me that when a guest arrived at her party, she said, "Since you didn't RSVP, I thought you weren't coming." The guest replied, "RSVP is only required if you are NOT going to attend."
  • Another person didn't RSVP, and the hostess called a couple of days in advance to check with him. He made an excuse for not being able to make it, but later let it be known that the real reason was because she had called. He said, "I can't stand it when people pressure you by calling to see if you're coming." Trying to get a head-count is now considered pressure?

 

 

Répondez s'il vous plaît = respond please



#9 SacKen

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 05:11 PM

 

A couple of recent experiences:

  • Someone I know told me that when a guest arrived at her party, she said, "Since you didn't RSVP, I thought you weren't coming." The guest replied, "RSVP is only required if you are NOT going to attend."
  • Another person didn't RSVP, and the hostess called a couple of days in advance to check with him. He made an excuse for not being able to make it, but later let it be known that the real reason was because she had called. He said, "I can't stand it when people pressure you by calling to see if you're coming." Trying to get a head-count is now considered pressure?

 

 

I'd like to see a national poll to find out if people that think this way have EVER hosted an event themselves.  I'm guessing that they haven't.


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#10 Dave Burrell

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 08:09 AM

 

A couple of recent experiences:

  • Someone I know told me that when a guest arrived at her party, she said, "Since you didn't RSVP, I thought you weren't coming." The guest replied, "RSVP is only required if you are NOT going to attend."
  • Another person didn't RSVP, and the hostess called a couple of days in advance to check with him. He made an excuse for not being able to make it, but later let it be known that the real reason was because she had called. He said, "I can't stand it when people pressure you by calling to see if you're coming." Trying to get a head-count is now considered pressure?

 

 

First world problem, being "pressured" to RSVP for a party.   :rolleyes:

 

What a loser saying they couldn't stand being "pressured". That person will soon find themselves never invited to anything again.


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