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Living In Lexington Hills, Folsom


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#1 ajsj

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 08:32 PM

Hello All

We are considering moving to folsom to be close to family, we have lot of friends in Folsom. We are considering lexington hills, none of our friends live there or go to the neighborhood Oak chan school. We would like to get a few concerns addressed:

 

1) How is Oak Chan school? Are the teachers and staff responsive to kids needs? How is the parent community? Are the parents involved?.

2) Some parts of Lexington hills look unkept, front yards are drying and some homes are badly in need of paint. Are there any locations we should be worried about?. The home values have kept steady, and looks like most folks have lived in the neighborhood for decades.

3) These are older homes and some of these homes are still in great condition, big lots and mature landscapping makes this neighborhood desirable, why are the home values not as high as empire ranch or prairie oaks?

4) This is a quiet neighborhood, it looks a safe neighborhood? Is it?

5) In general, are there kids in the neighborhood?. Since most families have lived there for a long time, maybe there are more empty nesters?. Is that the case?

6) How would you generally say people here are? friendly, outgoing? or reserved?/quiet?.

 

Would appreciate any/all comments. Thank You



#2 Steve Heard

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:20 PM

Hello AJSJ, and welcome to myfolsom.com!

 

I'll try to address your concerns:

 

   1) How is Oak Chan school? Are the teachers and staff responsive to kids needs? How is the parent community? Are the parents involved? - Oak Chan, like most of Folsom schools, has enjoyed strong parent involvement, which may in part explain why they have such high API scores. They hit 911, with a target of 800, and rank a 9 out of 10.  Perhaps some parents can chime in.

 

    2) Some parts of Lexington hills look unkept, front yards are drying and some homes are badly in need of paint. Are there any locations we should be worried about?. The home values have kept steady, and looks like most folks have lived in the neighborhood for decades. The whole town has dying lawns, as we're in the middle of a drought and are limited to 2 days of watering. Some folks might be watering more, some less, some more efficiently. There are no 'bad' areas of Lexington Hills. Living on North or South Lexington or on Silberhorn, you'll get a bit of traffic, but it is a great neighborhood.

 

    3) These are older homes and some of these homes are still in great condition, big lots and mature landscapping makes this neighborhood desirable, why are the home values not as high as empire ranch or prairie oaks? I think it is age-related. Most homes in Lexington Hills were built late 80's to about '91. In comparison, Empire Ranch homes were built after 2000. Newer usually sells for more, and they have less wear. 

 

    4) This is a quiet neighborhood, it looks a safe neighborhood? Is it? Safety is of primary concern, and Folsom is very safe. We have a great police department, and neighbors tend to look out for each other. Most of the crime in town is petty crime.

 

    5) In general, are there kids in the neighborhood?. Since most families have lived there for a long time, maybe there are more empty nesters?. Is that the case? The neighborhood has its share of turnover. About 40 to 50 homes per year have sold over the past few. Check with the school district. I believe Oak Chan is full, or close to it.

 

    6) How would you generally say people here are? friendly, outgoing? or reserved?/quiet? I don't live there, but have sold homes there and have friends there. Like the rest of Folsom, it is quite the mix. You have friendly neighbors who want to organize block parties and play dates, and quiet neighbors who want to keep to themselves. Each block or court can be different.

 

Here's a bit on Oak Chan http://school-rating...3306107965.html    

 

If you don't have friends and family in the neighborhood, what is it that attracts you to Lexington Hills? It is a great area, but so is most of Folsom.

 

If you are attracted by established neighborhoods, with lots of trees and access to trails and parks, try Willow Creek, Briggs Ranch, and Natoma Station, too.

 

Broadstone and Empire Ranch are probably what we'd consider well established by now, though without many of the native oaks found in other neighborhoods.

 

Drop me a line here or in private with any other questions.


Steve Heard

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#3 Thinkingoutloud

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 12:34 PM

Hi,

I live in Lex Hills and happy to share my thoughts.

First, it's the only neighborhood we looked at (in our price range).  We loved the large lots, mature trees, lack of HOAs and promixity to trails.

 

1) How is Oak Chan school? Are the teachers and staff responsive to kids needs? How is the parent community? Are the parents involved?.  We don't have kids that go there yet, so check in with me in a few years, but our neighbors all do and the love the school.  It's ranked 9/10 and is very good acadmically. 

 

2) Some parts of Lexington hills look unkept, front yards are drying and some homes are badly in need of paint. Are there any locations we should be worried about?. The home values have kept steady, and looks like most folks have lived in the neighborhood for decades.  The water restrictions have taken a toll on our lawns.  And you will get a few folks who don't care too much about yard maintainence.  If that is important to you, there are other neighborhoods that have HOAs and do all the maintaince keeping things looking neat.  In Lex Hills it's a middle class neighborhood with it's share of show piece lawns and those that throw out a hose once in a while.  At least we don't have folks that park on the lawn. ;-)

That is the same for maintainence.  All of the homes are the same age and some still haven't re-roofed or painted and it shows.  But overall the neighborhood is kept up and is fulll of middlle of the road socio-economic families.  The values have been pretty steady. 

 

3) These are older homes and some of these homes are still in great condition, big lots and mature landscapping makes this neighborhood desirable, why are the home values not as high as empire ranch or prairie oaks?  The homes are older and people will pay more for newer more "grand" homes.  Lex Hills are decent homes but lack things like granite countertops and wet bars and things like that that add to a homes value.  In my case (we bought in 2008) and we decided that larger lot and trees were more important to us than a newer home.  everyone has their priority list.

 

4) This is a quiet neighborhood, it looks a safe neighborhood? Is it?  Yes, it is!  There are a few instances of petty theft (our bikes were stolen from the bed of our truck inour driveway overnight) and in the middle of teh economic meltdown Folsom had a few run ins with home robberies (several in Lex Hills)  but in general, we feel totally comfortable leaving our door unlocked, don't have an alarm, and we never worry.

 

5) In general, are there kids in the neighborhood?. Since most families have lived there for a long time, maybe there are more empty nesters?. Is that the case?

6) How would you generally say people here are? friendly, outgoing? or reserved?/quiet?.  For our street, it's a mixed -age neighborhood.  Many of the neighbors are the original owners from 20+ years ago with kids grown and moved off to college, some are like us who moved there 4-8 years ago with kids under 5 and now we are getting some new younger families moving in with babies.  It's a great neighborhood, people are freindly, we wave, we know each other's names, we say hi and stop to chat in the street.  I really love our neighborhood and wouldn't trade it for any other one in Folsom!

 

I'm happy to answer any other questions you may have.

 



Oooh, also, there might be a hosue coming onto the market on my street.  Our freinds who live there were told by their landlord that they are selling the house.  So keep an eye out.  They don't come up often - turnover is pretty low on our street.



#4 ajsj

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:13 PM

Thanks for the answers to both of you Thinkingoutloud and Steve. These are good answers. We love Lex hills for the same reasons as you- Quiet, big lots and mature trees. Thank You



#5 kaybird

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Posted 01 July 2014 - 03:13 PM

My daughters both went to Oak Chan, with my youngest just finishing in May. We had a very positive experience at the school. Parents are very involved, teachers and administration are responsive. 

 

Other than one bad apple, I've found my neighbors here in Lex Hills to be absolutely wonderful. There are lots of families with young kids, so my girls have lots of friends around. My husband and I bought in 1999, and haven't regretted it for one minute. 

 

Feel free to send me a private message if you have any specific questions. 



#6 MikeinFolsom

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 10:35 AM

We lived in Lexington Hills, now live in the Parkways.  Really liked the quality of the house we had in Lexington Hills.  Didn't like the fact my neighbor(s) decided that 12" high weeds were a suitable landscape.  Didn't really like living next to a guy that painted his house olive green.  Oak Chan has a real winner for a principal now.  The neighborhood as a whole in Lexington Hills is very, very nice.  Mature trees especially.  Really depends on exactly what part of the Hills you are talking.  Can't really go wrong with a neighborhood until you start mentioning Talisman or Hoxie. 



#7 cw68

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 10:43 AM

We lived in Lexington Hills, now live in the Parkways.  Really liked the quality of the house we had in Lexington Hills.  Didn't like the fact my neighbor(s) decided that 12" high weeds were a suitable landscape.  Didn't really like living next to a guy that painted his house olive green.  Oak Chan has a real winner for a principal now.  The neighborhood as a whole in Lexington Hills is very, very nice.  Mature trees especially.  Really depends on exactly what part of the Hills you are talking.  Can't really go wrong with a neighborhood until you start mentioning Talisman or Hoxie. 

 

Not judging, truly just curious because I just don't get why people care about house color, but why did an olive green house bother you?



#8 nomad

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 11:22 AM

Try selling your house next to the sore thumb and maybe you'll see why these odd color houses aren't really great for neighborhood values overall.



#9 Steve Heard

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 12:37 PM

Try selling your house next to the sore thumb and maybe you'll see why these odd color houses aren't really great for neighborhood values overall.

 

I must admit that I'm not a color specialist, but I think my neighbor has an olive green house, and it's quite beautiful. Now, if it were pink or turquoise, that might really look odd, but I think of olive green as a kind of earthy tone.

 

I sell homes for a living, and condition of neighbor homes trumps color every time.

 

I've had clients refuse homes because of boats in neighbors' driveways, cars in disrepair, un-mowed lawns, or being in need of paint.

 

I remember there was a home on the market a few years back. It was a popular model on a cul-de-sac, but it wasn't selling. Photos and description were good. I had a client who was interested, and I arranged to show it. I got there and discovered the problem. 

 

The neighbors directly across the street had a tattered gazebo up in the driveway, with a couple of lawn chairs and an old dining-room type chair and an old coffee table beneath it, and kids' toys allover the lawn. There was a woman sitting out there, and a guy in a huge, loud, banged up SUV came and parked out front and went inside.

 

My clients drove up, we went inside and the husband said, 'No way am I living here'. 

 

I believe that house eventually went as a short-sale.


Steve Heard

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Keller Williams Realty

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Owner - MyFolsom.com

916 718 9577 


#10 cw68

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 02:53 PM

Try selling your house next to the sore thumb and maybe you'll see why these odd color houses aren't really great for neighborhood values overall.


My question is the WHY would an olive green house color bother someone. Why would one perceive it would hurt resale? I don't like living in a neighborhood where all the houses are neutral. To me it looks boring, lifeless, bland, and devoid of personality. Please don't take this and turn it into an insult, like saying something like, "oh, so you're OK if your neighbor turns their front yard into zoo or a replica of an amusement park?"

I'm just trying to get why some people don't like an olive green house. Nothing more, nothing less.

#11 nomad

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 03:05 PM

It may not just be the house color. If you add some odd trim color and the fact that pretty much all the roofs are red tile you can end up with quite an unsightly mess to most people's color palettes.



#12 MikeinFolsom

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 08:19 PM

I think it was because it did stick out like a sore thumb.  There is a certain trend and color scheme to the neighborhood...well, at least 10 years ago there was.  And the green color wasn't a very decent green, in my opinion only.  But it was the only green house in that neighborhood I could find.  They were also the type that saved the environment by only mowing their lawns every other month. 






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