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New Ca. Law Bill Ab 2127 Limiting Full Contact Football Practice

Youth Football High School Football

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#1 Tyto Alba

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

A Bill was passed to limit full contact football practices to two per week (90 minutes each) during the regular season.   The concern is the concussion risk.   They also added a protocol to return to play for at least seven days.

 

In New York,  an Assemblyman tried to ban youth contact football to athletes under the age of eleven.

 

It is too bad the politicians have to get involved.    The parents should make the decision if their athlete plays youth football.

 

The participants understand the injury risk.

 

I understand football was never meant for most young athletes.  The families that chose to participate and endure the risk of the sport should have the freedom to choose.  

 

I think the coaches need more scrimmage time during the week to get prepared.    Now they have more liability.



#2 cw68

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 03:47 PM

I don't think that participants do understand the risk. I think it's sad that the government had to get involved because coaches and parents seem far too willing to risk the health and safety of others.

I'm a huge football fan and both of my kids (boy and girl) played football until middle school. However, knowing the risks and knowing the sport, I had them play flag football.

I have plenty of friends and family involved in the sport and, on the strong advice of a friend who was also the head coach of a state championship team, there was no way I was letting play tackle at such youn ahead. Flag football still teaches the kids the theory and mechanics of the game.

There were a number of times when I was approached by adults involved in the Jr Bulldogs program trying to my son to play for them. I told them my reasons and was usually told that if he wanted to play when he was older he'd be competing against families who were involved and who had volunteered for years. I mentioned that I wasn't willing to risk my kid's health and safety and if they didn't choose him based on skill them so be it.

Football and brain injuries is a very real and very serious problem. This isn't just something that can be cloaked under "tradition."

If you haven't already watched "The League of Denial: the NFL's Concussion Crisis" I highly recommend you do.

For some reason we have begun to believe that we should expect our kids to train seriously at young ages and to focus on one sport in order to improve instead of having them play many sports, which allows their bodies and muscles to grow all over instead of stressing certain parts through repetitive movements.

We need to relax and take care of our kids' health first, our personal enjoyment second.

#3 Deb aka Resume Lady

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 03:55 PM

I don't think that participants do understand the risk. I think it's sad that the government had to get involved because coaches and parents seem far too willing to risk the health and safety of others.

I'm a huge football fan and both of my kids (boy and girl) played football until middle school. However, knowing the risks and knowing the sport, I had them play flag football.

I have plenty of friends and family involved in the sport and, on the strong advice of a friend who was also the head coach of a state championship team, there was no way I was letting play tackle at such youn ahead. Flag football still teaches the kids the theory and mechanics of the game.

There were a number of times when I was approached by adults involved in the Jr Bulldogs program trying to my son to play for them. I told them my reasons and was usually told that if he wanted to play when he was older he'd be competing against families who were involved and who had volunteered for years. I mentioned that I wasn't willing to risk my kid's health and safety and if they didn't choose him based on skill them so be it.

Football and brain injuries is a very real and very serious problem. This isn't just something that can be cloaked under "tradition."

If you haven't already watched "The League of Denial: the NFL's Concussion Crisis" I highly recommend you do.

For some reason we have begun to believe that we should expect our kids to train seriously at young ages and to focus on one sport in order to improve instead of having them play many sports, which allows their bodies and muscles to grow all over instead of stressing certain parts through repetitive movements.

We need to relax and take care of our kids' health first, our personal enjoyment second.

I fully agree.


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#4 Tyto Alba

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 09:57 PM

I don't think that participants do understand the risk. I think it's sad that the government had to get involved because coaches and parents seem far too willing to risk the health and safety of others.

I'm a huge football fan and both of my kids (boy and girl) played football until middle school. However, knowing the risks and knowing the sport, I had them play flag football.

I have plenty of friends and family involved in the sport and, on the strong advice of a friend who was also the head coach of a state championship team, there was no way I was letting play tackle at such youn ahead. Flag football still teaches the kids the theory and mechanics of the game.

There were a number of times when I was approached by adults involved in the Jr Bulldogs program trying to my son to play for them. I told them my reasons and was usually told that if he wanted to play when he was older he'd be competing against families who were involved and who had volunteered for years. I mentioned that I wasn't willing to risk my kid's health and safety and if they didn't choose him based on skill them so be it.

Football and brain injuries is a very real and very serious problem. This isn't just something that can be cloaked under "tradition."

If you haven't already watched "The League of Denial: the NFL's Concussion Crisis" I highly recommend you do.

For some reason we have begun to believe that we should expect our kids to train seriously at young ages and to focus on one sport in order to improve instead of having them play many sports, which allows their bodies and muscles to grow all over instead of stressing certain parts through repetitive movements.

We need to relax and take care of our kids' health first, our personal enjoyment second.

I respect the call you made in keeping your family safe.

 

Using Folsom as an example,  I do think there are enough people on the practice field qualified to make the correct judgement call if a football practice or certain drills are deemed unsafe.   The leagues the teams are participating in usually set strict standards for safety and practice (including practice time).   The League officials,  Coaches of all the teams and Board Members have always been liable for the athletes and could be sued at any time.    

 

Going back to the game,  being on a real football team is something special the children will always remember.   Almost all of the athletes will remember the good and bad of the season and take the lessons and apply them to other activities in life.   The discipline and preparation taught at the young age is priceless.     The sport is also good for the athletes self esteem.    That is one of the reasons it is important to preserve and protect the contact youth football avenue for families who choose to participate.    Do believe age 9 to 10 is a good age to start.    Some start at 7 to 8 which is OK because the ones that show up and make the team do very well.    Plus,  at the younger age groups it sometimes works out better to be on the small side because at the certain age quickness is important.   When the kids get older you need to be big and quick.

 

The youth football season is short with the contact starting in August and the season concluding the last week of October.  If the team is fortunate to make a playoff run,  it would be all over by the second week of November.    The season is not long at all and limited to one season of the year.



#5 cw68

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 09:21 AM

First off, the benefits you mention can be had as part of flag-football, which isn't any less real. Kids don't need to be made to feel like a professional athlete to enjoy it, learn from it, and to make memories.

Secondly, if coaches and parents kept kids safe, we wouldn't be seeing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in high school and college football players. Play is rougher than ever, players are bigger than ever. Physical conditioning techniques are intense. Coaches and parents routinely encourage kids to rub some dirt on it and get back in the game, without trained health professionals evaluating them first. This endangers the athlete by creating the opportunity for the athlete to incur second impact syndrome, which is particularly damaging.

It's not the youth leagues of the 50s anymore so we have to quit wistfully thinking it's like times past.

Again, have you seen "League of Denial?" You should watch it if you haven't.

CTE is life-threatening and irreversible. Protecting the health of our children is arguably the single most important thing an adult can do for a child. What good is memories of football championships and team comradery when you are suffering from dementia and blow your brains out as a result of suffering from CTE? Ask Jim McMahon how great his life is...

Again, I want to reiterate my love for football. Anyone who knows me knows my semi-obsession with it and knows that my family is a football family. I want this figured out, I don't want football to end - it needs to be FIXED.

I want them to go back to leatherheads and get rid of most of the padding and protection. Look at rugby - it's one of the most violent games out there but more of the injuries are self-limiting because they are felt. Your not going to head butt someone full-steam if you're cracking skulls. Just my two cents.

#6 awood

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 11:01 AM

First off, the benefits you mention can be had as part of flag-football, which isn't any less real. Kids don't need to be made to feel like a professional athlete to enjoy it, learn from it, and to make memories.

Secondly, if coaches and parents kept kids safe, we wouldn't be seeing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in high school and college football players. Play is rougher than ever, players are bigger than ever. Physical conditioning techniques are intense. Coaches and parents routinely encourage kids to rub some dirt on it and get back in the game, without trained health professionals evaluating them first. This endangers the athlete by creating the opportunity for the athlete to incur second impact syndrome, which is particularly damaging.

It's not the youth leagues of the 50s anymore so we have to quit wistfully thinking it's like times past.

Again, have you seen "League of Denial?" You should watch it if you haven't.

CTE is life-threatening and irreversible. Protecting the health of our children is arguably the single most important thing an adult can do for a child. What good is memories of football championships and team comradery when you are suffering from dementia and blow your brains out as a result of suffering from CTE? Ask Jim McMahon how great his life is...

Again, I want to reiterate my love for football. Anyone who knows me knows my semi-obsession with it and knows that my family is a football family. I want this figured out, I don't want football to end - it needs to be FIXED.

I want them to go back to leatherheads and get rid of most of the padding and protection. Look at rugby - it's one of the most violent games out there but more of the injuries are self-limiting because they are felt. Your not going to head butt someone full-steam if you're cracking skulls. Just my two cents.

You are speaking passionately (which I appreciate), but I am not sure whether to call you an idiot or a genius? :mellow:

 

Can we at least agree that our kids safety SHOULDN'T be the responsibility of government regulation?  It really should be an educated decision made by the parents with consideration for the kid themselves.



#7 4thgenFolsomite

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 11:52 AM

in this case, I side with the government stepping in to regulate what the government, via the tax-payer funded school system, provides in the way of safety requirements. 

 

so many kids have big dreams of being famous sports millionaires (better luck playing the lotto) and end up with life long annoying injuries.


Knowing the past helps deciphering the future.

#8 Tyto Alba

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 06:51 PM

First off, the benefits you mention can be had as part of flag-football, which isn't any less real. Kids don't need to be made to feel like a professional athlete to enjoy it, learn from it, and to make memories.
                                                                

  

Again,  I respect the decision you made protecting your family from full contact youth football.      Glad the flag football program was a positive experience for your family.



#9 cw68

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 10:25 PM

You are speaking passionately (which I appreciate), but I am not sure whether to call you an idiot or a genius? :mellow:
 
Can we at least agree that our kids safety SHOULDN'T be the responsibility of government regulation?  It really should be an educated decision made by the parents with consideration for the kid themselves.


I might be an idiotic genius? ;)

No, I'm sorry, but we can't agree. We are seeing signicantly increasing instances of CTE in younger and younger players while conditioning and practices are becoming increasingly more aggressive and more frequent at younger and younger ages. We have knowledge on how the risk can be reduced that coaches and organized leagues are not only ignoring, but doing the opposite.

Parents should be able to send their kids to the schools that our taxes are paying for with the trust that the staff is acting in the kids' best interests. Government requirements for kids' safety in a government paid program is more than reasonable.

#10 supermom

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 05:07 AM

Now if only we could get the Bull dog cheer teams to regulate how many somersaults and beat down of other girls; the schools could be just a bit safer.







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