Jump to content






Photo
- - - - -

Recommend Trees For Along Back Fence Line


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 M.E.G.

M.E.G.

    All Star

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 485 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Folsom

Posted 22 March 2008 - 02:58 PM

I need some ideas and recommendations on deciduous trees (3) that would give my back fence line privacy. We had a huge tree that had to be cut down because it was too close to the fence and the roots were growing under the fence and under the neighbor's patio. We have a typical size backyard. The builder behind us built on very small lots and the neighbor's patio is very close to fence. We get morning and afternoon sun. The soil is all Folsom, hard and loaded with river rock.

I need something that will grow and not be a monster with roots etc. No evergreens.

M.E.G.

Mechelle Reasoner (formerly Gooch)

Movin'...So You Can!

Morris Williams Realty

Call or txt: 916 955-8698,

Email me

Read my blog, search for homes, find out more about Folsom at FolsomCorner.com


#2 sat

sat

    Hall Of Famer

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 22 March 2008 - 04:51 PM

When we were putting in our backyard, and wanted to plant some trees along the fence line, the nursery we went to suggested Chinese Pistachio trees. I am so happy we took their adivce. The trees are gorgeous, and just enough to give our back yard privacy, but not overbearing. Compared to some of our other trees, the Chinese Pistachio trees are incredibly low maintenance.

#3 M.E.G.

M.E.G.

    All Star

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 485 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Folsom

Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:06 PM

QUOTE(sat @ Mar 22 2008, 05:51 PM) View Post
When we were putting in our backyard, and wanted to plant some trees along the fence line, the nursery we went to suggested Chinese Pistachio trees. I am so happy we took their adivce. The trees are gorgeous, and just enough to give our back yard privacy, but not overbearing. Compared to some of our other trees, the Chinese Pistachio trees are incredibly low maintenance.


Does it drop any seeds? I know that it is not the nut bearing tree, but any mess? How long did it take to grow?

M.E.G.

Mechelle Reasoner (formerly Gooch)

Movin'...So You Can!

Morris Williams Realty

Call or txt: 916 955-8698,

Email me

Read my blog, search for homes, find out more about Folsom at FolsomCorner.com


#4 dimeracer

dimeracer

    All Star

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 477 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:14 PM

QUOTE(sat @ Mar 22 2008, 05:51 PM) View Post
When we were putting in our backyard, and wanted to plant some trees along the fence line, the nursery we went to suggested Chinese Pistachio trees. I am so happy we took their adivce. The trees are gorgeous, and just enough to give our back yard privacy, but not overbearing. Compared to some of our other trees, the Chinese Pistachio trees are incredibly low maintenance.


Flowering Pears are good if you're limited on space. They grow tall and narrow.

#5 Deb aka Resume Lady

Deb aka Resume Lady

    Hopeless Addict

  • No Politics!
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,966 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Folsom
  • Interests:Sole proprietor: Tailored Resume Services
    Volunteer: Court Appointed Special Advocate for a child in the foster care system

Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:16 PM

The tree to which Sat is referring is correctly called a Chinese Pistache. Here's information about the tree: http://selectree.cal....lasso?rid=1086 .
Job Search Consultant
Tailored Resume Services
(916) 984-0855

Volunteer, Court Appointed Special Advocate for Sacramento CASA * I Am for the Child
Making a Difference in the Life of Abused and Neglected Children in Foster Care
http://www.sacramentocasa.org/

I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do. ~ Edward Everett Hale

"How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world." ~ Anne Frank

#6 sat

sat

    Hall Of Famer

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:44 PM

We have had the trees now for six years, and I think they are roughly 30 feet tall. I have read that they can be fruit-bearing, but I have not experienced that with our trees. In fact, the leaves are so small that they disintegrate (or kind of mulch themselves), that we have never had to rake the leaves up (so far).

#7 Bill Z

Bill Z

    Hopeless Addict

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,789 posts
  • Location:Briggs Ranch

Posted 22 March 2008 - 07:39 PM

The Chinese Elm has always been one of my favorites. Probably because I grew up with one in my front yard in Livermore. So of course, you know what I planted in my front yard here in Folsom. The city or builder had put a Sycamore in the small yard on the side of my driveway and there was nothing in the big yard in front of my living room window, so now there is a beautiful Chinese Elm. I love the umbrella shape of it's canopy.

http://selectree.cal...30D54kSL22141BB
I would rather be Backpacking


#8 newsblaze

newsblaze

    All Star

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 441 posts
  • Location:folsom Historic District
  • Interests:News, computers, the garden, HFRA, bagpipes, Folsom.

Posted 23 March 2008 - 10:54 AM

Ornamental Pear and Caolina Laurel are what we have on our fenceline.
3 pears and 6 laurels. They all grew from 8 feet to 15 feet in one year.
- in the historic district.
They don't drop a lot of leaves and although the laurels have black berries, I don't see them on teh ground much.
Maybe the squirrels and raccoons eat them all.
Alan Gray
Read Folsom news at
http://folsomlocalnews.com
Support Our Troops, Read Their Stories
at http://newsblaze.com

#9 forumreader

forumreader

    Living Legend

  • Registered Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,897 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:05 AM

Are the Ornamental Pears the ones with the white, STINKY blossoms?

#10 M.E.G.

M.E.G.

    All Star

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 485 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Folsom

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:47 AM

QUOTE(forumreader @ Mar 24 2008, 11:05 AM) View Post
Are the Ornamental Pears the ones with the white, STINKY blossoms?


Good question! Inquiring minds want to know! I love this forum. My husband and I were working in the yard over the weekend and I was mentiioning the different trees that might go in the backyard and he is wondering where I am getting all the info. I just point out that I asked the myfolsom readers their experience and opinions. More accurate than the landscape books that say the tree that we had to chop down would be a perfect patio tree!

Keep the suggestions coming.

M.E.G.

Mechelle Reasoner (formerly Gooch)

Movin'...So You Can!

Morris Williams Realty

Call or txt: 916 955-8698,

Email me

Read my blog, search for homes, find out more about Folsom at FolsomCorner.com


#11 4thgenFolsomite

4thgenFolsomite

    Hopeless Addict

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,092 posts

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:59 AM

QUOTE(M.E.G. @ Mar 22 2008, 02:58 PM) View Post
I need some ideas and recommendations on deciduous trees (3) that would give my back fence line privacy. We had a huge tree that had to be cut down because it was too close to the fence and the roots were growing under the fence and under the neighbor's patio. We have a typical size backyard. The builder behind us built on very small lots and the neighbor's patio is very close to fence. We get morning and afternoon sun. The soil is all Folsom, hard and loaded with river rock.

I need something that will grow and not be a monster with roots etc. No evergreens.

M.E.G.



Are you trying to get shade or privacy or block a view? There are evergreens that don't grow that tall and lack invasive roots. Just depends on what you want. I agree on the Chinese Pistache, they're GREAT trees with good shade and beautiful fall color.
Knowing the past helps deciphering the future.

#12 supermom

supermom

    Supermom

  • Premium Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,469 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 24 March 2008 - 11:30 AM

QUOTE(M.E.G. @ Mar 22 2008, 03:58 PM) View Post
I need some ideas and recommendations on deciduous trees (3) that would give my back fence line privacy. We had a huge tree that had to be cut down because it was too close to the fence and the roots were growing under the fence and under the neighbor's patio. We have a typical size backyard. The builder behind us built on very small lots and the neighbor's patio is very close to fence. We get morning and afternoon sun. The soil is all Folsom, hard and loaded with river rock.

I need something that will grow and not be a monster with roots etc. No evergreens.

M.E.G.

I like this tree: http://en.wikipedia....lia_grandiflora


or this:http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/CoopExt/4dmg/Trees/mayday.htm


or this: http://www.cebik.com...melanchier.html

I really like this tree/shrub: http://daviswiki.org/Western_Redbud

1450138_10151752829111381_2039032080_n.p

 


#13 folsomwannabe

folsomwannabe

    Netizen

  • Registered Members
  • Pip
  • 12 posts

Posted 24 March 2008 - 11:39 AM

I don't have any recommendations as to a particular kind of tree, but if you have SMUD make sure to check them out for free shade trees. They can be expensive and you should qualify especially because you mentioned you get afternoon sun. :-)

#14 folsom500

folsom500

    Folsom Gardner

  • Moderator
  • 6,256 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Folsom

Posted 24 March 2008 - 12:19 PM

QUOTE(dimeracer @ Mar 22 2008, 06:14 PM) View Post
Flowering Pears are good if you're limited on space. They grow tall and narrow.


Braford Pears smell to high heaven in the spring- Awful trees.
The Pistach is a good tree - no smell but best to buy in the fall so you can see the leaf colors as some are brilliant and others just so so ... No real mess with them either and a good root system- but set it up initially with a 3" pipe for deep watering to drive the roots down as you should with any tree. - DO NOT get Tallow as messy messy - Crepe Mertles are nice as well.

why no Evergreen ?

cheers
F500

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has"
-Margaret Mead-

#15 folsom500

folsom500

    Folsom Gardner

  • Moderator
  • 6,256 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Folsom

Posted 24 March 2008 - 12:21 PM

QUOTE(Bill Z @ Mar 22 2008, 08:39 PM) View Post
The Chinese Elm has always been one of my favorites. Probably because I grew up with one in my front yard in Livermore. So of course, you know what I planted in my front yard here in Folsom. The city or builder had put a Sycamore in the small yard on the side of my driveway and there was nothing in the big yard in front of my living room window, so now there is a beautiful Chinese Elm. I love the umbrella shape of it's canopy.

http://selectree.cal...30D54kSL22141BB



Chinese elm have horrible surface root problems and will tear up a patio or cemet within 10 feet. They are also weak branched after 15 or so years so can have large branches falling in storms.
"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has"
-Margaret Mead-




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users