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Solar Tube Installation On A Tile Roof


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#1 knittychick

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 10:09 AM

I am wondering if anyone has had solar tubes installed on a tile roof. We have some dark areas of our house and have been considering solar tubes for, literally, years. Ive mentioned it to a few people and they all have horror stories, not their horror stories, but second, third or fourth-hand horror stories. Anyone have first-hand experience or at least concrete information either positive or negative?

Also, I checked the myfolsom archives last week for an electrician and called Byron Wise from WiseCo Electric and he was outstanding! He fixed our problem and found mistakes the last electrician had made (explains the smoke detectors going off periodically). He was prompt, friendly, professional and very fairly priced. I will definitely call him again for electrical problems or projects. I highly recommend him, you can contact him at 916-752-4303 or http://www.wisecoelectric.com/.

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#2 The Average Joe

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 10:31 AM

Comp roofs are easy, tile is more difficult, and round tile is harder still. I would not suggest this as a do-it-yourself project. Make sure you get someone with experience and a good reputation as there are layers of felt, flashing and counterflashing (as well as the tile) to contend with.
Many "handymen" don't have any clue what they are doing. Case in point: When water started dripping on the new hardwood, I thought skylights were the culprit. Further investigation revealed that the "handyman" who had installed the chimney chase for the wood burning stove basically cut a hole in the roof, framed the chase, nailed some siding on, and covered the top/corners with 1x3. There was minimal flashing and NO weatherproofing at all.
It wasn't a total loss... my neighbors got to hear my impressive knowledge of expletives while I tore off the chase, patched the roof, replaced the felt and installed new shingles in the cold, drizzly, windy winter air...

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#3 Bill Z

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 11:09 AM

QUOTE (JBailey @ Dec 22 2009, 10:31 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Comp roofs are easy, tile is more difficult, and round tile is harder still. I would not suggest this as a do-it-yourself project. Make sure you get someone with experience and a good reputation as there are layers of felt, flashing and counterflashing (as well as the tile) to contend with.
Many "handymen" don't have any clue what they are doing. Case in point: When water started dripping on the new hardwood, I thought skylights were the culprit. Further investigation revealed that the "handyman" who had installed the chimney chase for the wood burning stove basically cut a hole in the roof, framed the chase, nailed some siding on, and covered the top/corners with 1x3. There was minimal flashing and NO weatherproofing at all.
It wasn't a total loss... my neighbors got to hear my impressive knowledge of expletives while I tore off the chase, patched the roof, replaced the felt and installed new shingles in the cold, drizzly, windy winter air...

I concur, hire a professional roofer. I'm a DIY kinda guy, and would be willing to tackle the job on a composition shingle roof, whereas concrete tile, forget it, I'll call the roofer.
I would rather be Backpacking


#4 folsombound

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 12:11 PM

Great question. If you have some installed, please let us know how it goes. I am definitely interested. My house could use several.




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